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Trent Murphy Jersey

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    October 11, 2018 12:57 AM PDT

    Spending on signing bonuses for international amateur free agents dropped 25 percent to $153 million from $203 million in the first year of restraints Trent Murphy Jersey , which cost Japanese two-way star Shohei Ohtani more than $100 million.

    Spending was capped by baseball’s collective bargaining agreement beginning with the signing period from last July 2 through June 15.

    Dominican shortstop Wander Franco received the largest bonus, $3,825,000 from Tampa Bay. Venezuelan catcher Daniel Flores was second at $3.3 million from Boston.

    Just five other players received bonuses of more than $2 million: Cuban outfielder Julio Pablo Martinez ($2.8 million from Texas) was third, followed by Bahamian outfielder Kristian Robinson ($2.55 million from Arizona), Dominican shortstop Luis Garcia ($2.5 million from Philadelphia), Ohtani ($2,315,000 from the Los Angeles Angels) and Dominican shortstop Rony Mauricio ($2.1 million from the New York Mets).

    Under the new rules, international amateurs were redefined as under 25 years old and with less than six years of professional experience, up from 23 years old and less than five years of experience. That meant teams were limited to what they could offer Ohtani, who hit .289 with six homers and 20 RBIs in 34 games and went 4-1 with a 3.10 ERA before the right-hander hurt his pitching elbow. Under the old rules, he would likely have signed a long-term deal for more than $150 million.

    During the 2016-17 signing period, four Cubans were given contracts that included signing bonuses above $5 million: Chicago White Sox outfielder Luis Robert agreed to $26 million, followed by San Diego pitcher Adrian Morejon at $11 million, and Cincinnati shortstop Alfredo Rodriguez and Padres outfielder Jorge Ona at $7 million each.

    San Diego spent $40.8 million on international amateurs in the 2016-17 signing period, incurring a $37.4 million tax. Other big spenders were the White Sox ($29 million in bonuses, $25.2 million in tax), Cincinnati ($17.7 million/$12.4 million) and Atlanta ($17.3 million/$12.8 million).

    Under the labor contract agreed to in November 2016, hard restrictions were put in place. Sixteen teams initially were limited in 2017-18 to $4.75 million, six to $5.25 million and eight to $5.75 million – all not counting bonuses of up to $10,000. Teams were able to trade allocations, and the New York Yankees boosted theirs to $8 Steelers Cheap Jerseys ,309,000, followed by Texas at $8.1 million and Boston at $8 million.

    Baltimore lowered its pool to $500,000.

    Teams’ bonus pools totaled $153.5 million and they spent $149,676,750. Counting bonuses of up to $10,000, which don’t count against the pool, spending totaled $153,362,100. The 2018-19 pools total $158,889,500, up 3.5 percent.

    Spending on international amateurs had increased from $74 million in 2012-13 to $156 million in 2015-16.

    As a result of exceeded thresholds in 2016-17 under the rules of the previous collective bargaining agreement, Atlanta, Cincinnati, Houston, Oakland, St. Louis, San Diego and Washington were prohibited from signing international amateurs for bonuses of more than $300,000 both in 2017-18 and will be again in 2018-19. The Chicago Cubs, Kansas City, the Los Angeles Dodgers and San Francisco were not allowed to in 2017-18.

    Restraints were introduced in the 2012-16 labor contract on spending on draft picks Kelvin Benjamin Jersey , players who reside in the U.S., Canada and Puerto Rico. Bonuses for those players totaled $234 million in 2011, dropped to $223 million in the first year of the new rules and didn’t reach their prior level until 2015’s $249 million, according to Major League Baseball. Draft spending rose to $269 million for 2016 selections and $289 million for 2017 picks.

    AP baseball: For most of the past month, Doug Baldwin has been a spectator as he dealt with a sore left knee that kept him from participating in Seattle Seahawks practices.

    It may be how Baldwin and the Seahawks end up managing most of the upcoming season for Seattle's No. 1 wide receiver.

    "I'm probably about 80-85 percent right now and the truth of the matter is it won't be 100 percent," Baldwin said. "It's something I've got to deal with for the rest of the season."

    At least Baldwin is back on the field and showing signs of progress. He won't play in the preseason finale Thursday against Oakland, but the expectation is that he will be ready for the regular-season opener Sept. 9 at Denver. The month of waiting to get back into practice has been difficult for Baldwin to handle.

    "To be out this long ... it was hard. It was hard emotionally. It was good to be back out there," he said.

    The team has offered few specifics about Baldwin's knee. Coach Pete Carroll simply called it a sore knee. Baldwin was coy when asked if he's undergone surgery, saying, "It depends on your definition of surgery."

    Whatever the full extent, it's clear the issue is something Seattle will have to manage with rest if it expects to have Baldwin for the entire season.

    "It will be something we have to manage throughout the course of the year. It will be day to day," Baldwin said.

    Baldwin practiced two days at the start of camp before becoming a spectator and spending more time in the training room than on any field. He said the knee issue emerged during the first week of OTAs in the spring and he did not participate in the team's mandatory minicamp in June.

    Once he realized the knee wasn't responding as he hoped at the start of camp, it became a race to see if he could be ready for the start of the season.

    "The first two days of camp realized it wasn't where we wanted it to be in order for me to sustain the level of play, being able to express myself athletically, that I want to," Baldwin said. "So it was time to do something more serious."

    Baldwin is coming off a down season by his standards. He had 75 catches, 991 yards and eight touchdowns in 2017 as Seattle's overall offense took a step back. A year earlier, Baldwin had a career-best 94 receptions, and in 2016 he had 14 touchdown catches.

    He understands his role in Seattle's offense may be different this year with the addition of new offensive coordinator Brian Schottenheimer and a wide receiver group that includes newcomers Brandon Marshall and Jaron Brown. Not being able to be part of training camp has made the transition to the new offense a bit tougher.

    "Obviously I would have liked to have some game reps and more practice because I am a rep guy and especially now with the new offense," Baldwin said. "I would like to get the physical reps, especially with the quarterback trying to get that chemistry and build that rapport. I've been playing football since I was little. It's really not that much different for me. I've been in the league now going on eight years, at this point it should be like riding a bike."